Measuring climate change’s true cost

Pedestrians pass a frozen water fountain at Bryant Park in New York last month when a polar vortex brought the worst freeze in over 40 years to parts of the US. Picture: AP

When the financial consequences finally sink in, people will — perhaps — start taking climate change more seriously and make the tough decisions needed, writes Kyran Fitzgerald.

The impact of the global environmental upheaval is being felt in myriad ways.

The most recent examples include a record breaking heatwave in Australia, deadly wildfires in California, and the strange polar vortex event that brought the worst freeze in over 40 years to the US mid-west along with temperatures in the Arctic that are way above average.

Sign in or register for FREE to continue enjoying and to comment on our great range of opinion writers

Not a member yet? Register here

More on this topic

There’s isn’t this ‘both sides’ nonsense. If they discuss Newton they haven’t invited on some nut to argue gravity is just a thing snowflakes believe in

London climate change protesters to ‘pause’ rebellion if politicians negotiate

In pictures: Extinction Rebellion climate protests continue

Climate change protesters remain out in force in London as almost 700 arrested

More in this Section

Tech startups make music and events a smooth operation

Wide range of demands leave employers warier than ever

Options required for carbon tax to work

Agrifood lobby may derail EU-US trade talks

More by this author

Trump puts trade rules under strain

Central Bank boss ready for life in the fast Lane

Time to grow up over issue of ageing and the workplace

Asleep at the wheel on public projects


Lifestyle

We sell books: Sisters are doing it for themselves

Dark side of teen life: Bo Burnham's Eight Grade highlights anxieties of the self generation

Wealth inequality behind the extinction of mammals

Marginal ring ouzel could be next to disappear

More From The Irish Examiner